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Unrelenting rain brings Iowa near the worst crops for 25 years




Central Iowa's wet weather line causes some of the state's worst crops for more than 25 years, reports reported. According to the Iowa Department of Agriculture, Iowa farmers had only one day last week suitable for field work. reports that only 76% of the expected grain harvest is planted. Iowa's planting rate is 10 days behind 2018 and two weeks behind five-year average. The Iowa Department of Agriculture said that, so far, the least number of grains has been planted by this time in May since 1995. The report provides a similar view on soybeans. Soybean planting is two weeks behind with less than one third of the expected crop planted. It is the smallest amount planted since 1[ads1]993. Agricultural Secretary Mike Naig said uncontaminated wet weather is due and Iowa farmers are desperate for an extended dry spell. "It's been very challenging," Niag said. "Then again, the long-term forecast shows that we should see some warmer temperatures, but it's hard to see more sunshine days and dry weather put together, and that's what we need." Naig said that farmers may have to rely on crop insurance if conditions do not improve and they cannot manage to be more planted.

The Central Iowa line of wet weather causes some of the state's worst crops of more than 25 years, according to reports.

According to the Iowa Department of Agriculture, Iowa farmers had only one day last week suitable for field work.

The state reports that only 76% of the expected grain harvest has been planted. Iowa's planting rate is 10 days behind 2018 and two weeks behind the five-year average.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture said so far is the smallest amount of grain planted this time in May since 1995.

The report provides a similar view of soybeans. Soybean planting is two weeks behind with less than one third of the expected crop planted.

It is the smallest plant since 1993.

Agricultural Secretary Mike Naig said there was no wet weather, and the culprit in Iowa is desperate for an extended dry spell.

"It's been very challenging," Niag said. "Then again, the long-term forecast shows that we should see some warmer temperatures, but it's hard to see several days of sunshine and dry weather put together, and that's what we need."

Naig said that farmers may have to rely on crop insurance if conditions do not improve and they are unable to become more planted.

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