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Harley-Davidson pays a high bill for services in the city and county during the festival




With the Harley-Davidson 120th Homecoming celebration now in Milwaukee’s rearview mirror, county and city departments are tabulating the bill Harley-Davidson will owe. The Milwaukee-based company entered into a series of contracts with the city and county to use essential services throughout the country. festival, including law enforcement personnel and crews from the Department of Public Works.” Whenever they need help with barricades or parking meters, etc., we actually charge these special events to pay for those costs so the city doesn’t incur a lot,” said DPW- Commissioner Jerrel Kruschke. In total, Harley-Davidson will owe the city̵[ads1]7;s DPW approximately $8,300 for expenses incurred from the Harley parade and women’s ride. The Brady Street Business Improvement District will owe DPW an additional $7,761 to help with the Brady Street Experience. The Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office told WISN 12 News Harley-Davidson owes them approximately $43,000 for their services during the four-day event. “Because of our limited resources, most of it was done with overtime, so we’re looking at about 700 man-hours,” said MCSO Inspector Doug Holton. Milwaukee police told WISN 12 News they are still working to tabulate the final bill for their services, but say the amount is “significant.” Milwaukee Mayor Cavalier Johnson was pleased with the way events turned out this past weekend, calling it a success. He said the Harley Homecoming, combined with other events like Bastille Day, was a good test run when the Republican National Convention comes to Milwaukee in less than a year. While VISIT Milwaukee had estimated the city would earn more than $95 million in economic revenue from Harley Homecoming, Johnson said the number will be even higher during next year’s events when the 2% sales tax increase takes effect. “So we’re going to see a lot of economic impact in the city for once, for the first time ever in our history, we’re going to be able to directly benefit those that are also economically impacting, and that’s good for our taxpayers, that’s good for the city of Milwaukee,” said Johnson. Dollars that will go toward funding the essential services needed for these major events.

With the Harley-Davidson 120th Homecoming celebration now in Milwaukee’s rearview mirror, county and city departments are tabulating the bill Harley-Davidson will owe.

The Milwaukee-based company entered into a series of contracts with the city and county to use essential services throughout the festival, including law enforcement personnel and crews from the Department of Public Works.

“Anytime they need help with blocking or parking meters, etc., we actually charge these special events to pay for those costs so the city doesn’t incur a lot [of expenses]”, said DPW Commissioner Jerrel Kruschke.

In total, Harley-Davidson will owe the city’s DPW approximately $8,300 for expenses incurred from the Harley parade and women’s ride. The Brady Street Business Improvement District will owe DPW an additional $7,761 to help with the Brady Street Experience.

The Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office told WISN 12 News Harley-Davidson owes them approximately $43,000 for their services during the four-day event.

“Because of our limited resources, most of it was done with overtime, so we’re looking at about 700 hours of person hours,” said MCSO Inspector Doug Holton.

Milwaukee police told WISN 12 News they are still working to come up with the final bill for their services, but say the amount is “significant.”

Milwaukee Mayor Cavalier Johnson was pleased with the way events turned out this past weekend, calling it a success.

He said the Harley Homecoming, combined with other events like Bastille Day, was a good test run when the Republican National Convention comes to Milwaukee in less than a year.

While VISIT Milwaukee had estimated the city would earn more than $95 million in economic revenue from Harley Homecoming, Johnson said the number will be even higher during next year’s events when the 2% sales tax increase takes effect.

“So we’re going to see a lot of economic impact in the city for once, for the first time ever in our history, we’re going to be able to directly benefit those that are also economically impacting, and that’s good for our taxpayers, that’s good for the city of Milwaukee,” Johnson said.

Dollars that will go towards funding the essential services needed for these large events.



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