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CDC sparks a frenzy by encouraging people NOT to wash their chickens before they are stored




  The disease control centers issued a strict warning against washing raw chicken and other meat, explaining that it can spread bacteria in the kitchen

The disease control centers issued a strict warning against washing raw chicken and other meat, explaining that it can spread bacteria in the kitchen

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have triggered a discussion among cooks after It was recommended that consumers stop washing raw chicken before cooking.

A tweet on April 26 received more than 1[ads1]000 comments and 1600 retweets with people discussing whether they should follow the National Board of Health's advice.

Don't wash your raw chicken! Washing can spread bacteria from the chicken to other food or kitchen utensils in the kitchen, "the first tweet read.

Not everyone seemed to appreciate the advice.

In the game of CDC VS Our ancestors, ancestors of the victory Thanks for the concern, wrote a Twitter user.

"The CDC is out here as Thaos is trying to dust half of the population" wrote a Twitter user using an Avengers reference.

  CDC wrote: "Don't wash your raw chicken! Washing can spread bacteria from the chicken to other food or kitchen utensils in the kitchen." CDC wrote: "Don't wash your raw chicken!" Washing can spread bacteria from the chicken to other food or kitchen utensils in the kitchen.

CDC wrote: "Don't wash your raw chicken! Washes can spread bacteria from the chicken to other foods or kitchen utensils." 39;

  Not all appreciated CDC advice with many answers sarcastically to PSA

I was taught to clean chicken with lemon juice and vinegar rinse. I've always done it and will continue to. They don't get whirlpools or splashes everywhere, but I make sure that after cleaning the counters and sinking with bleach waste, the CDC regrets, I still clean the chicken, "another wrote. [19659005] Many others also agreed with such a procedure.

"Continuing to wash my uncooked poultry and disinfecting my sink and all surrounding areas," another chef said.

"Two words … Blekpray," wrote another user who explained their reasons for washing the meat and then cleaning up afterwards.

But the debate continued with more than a thousand people commenting on the CDC's simple advice.

  Others chimed in, not believing in what polarizing debate the problem had become [19659022] Others chimed in, not believing what a polarizing debate the problem had been

Others chimed in, not believing what a polarizing debate the problem had been

  Other Twitter users told about rows d e had with their family members about w

Other Twitter users told about rows they had with their family members about whether to wash the chicken or not

& As long as you cook it at the right temperature (165 internal degrees), the heat will kill 100% of the bacteria on or in the chicken … wherever you were brought up do not know this, if you work with a food-handling job at the origin level, you literally have to test this. That's the basics! & # 39;

& # 39; I know how to make chicken, have been cooking since 12 years, do not need a food-handling job at the origin. We are talking about CLEANING it as it comes out of the packaging from your local grocery store sweet. Bless your heart.

Others chimed in not believing in what polarizing debate the issues had become.

& # 39; CDC wrote the article. C !! D !! C !! The comments kill me. These are people who handle Ebola, but people can't trust their advice on poultry handling? & # 39;

& # 39; The answers in here remind me that many things do things like it was done before them and never asked why … now they have raw chicken juices on their clothes, floors and God knows what else … & # 39;

  The line continued with others arguing logically against the CDC's own advice

The line continued with others logically arguing against the CDC's own advice

Other Twitter users told about rows they had with their family members to wash or not.

& # 39; I argued about this with my mother once. Never again. She grew up in the country and will never change. As for me and my house, I let the fire / heat kill everything!

I don't know what people think "hot" tape water does to kill bacteria, but ok. I'm just gonna let them rock. I just like how people choose and choose what they want to believe. & # 39;

& # 39; Lemon juice and vinegar not to kill the dangerous bacteria and not penetrate far enough into the meat neither, your meat would turn to mush from acid if soaked for so long. The head is the only effective thing to kill everything that is present. & # 39;

The line continued with others who argued logically against the CDC's own recommendations:

& # 39; So we should just "cook" everything that sits in a maxi pillow for god knows how long? Eat again over feathers and bone dust! I continue to wash mine and not get sick of "scattered bacteria". You want it! "

But this tweet generated an equal response:

& # 39; if you have leftover feathers and bone dust on the chicken, then stop buying raw meat from under the bridge or where to find it. & # 39; [19659005] It also seemed to be a little comforting that generations of family cooks before they were able to wash the chicken without pain.

My grandmother and I wash (edit) our chicken.You clean the kitchen with bleach when you are done , "they wrote.

& # 39; I wash all meat before cooking, & # 39; answered another. "The one who came up with this" trend "of not washing chicken before cooking, uhmmmm, I will never reach your dining table. I'm sure people really want to make meat that has put in bloody juices. 19659044] Three days later, due to some skepticism from Twitter users, the CDC had to post a follow-up tweet ” class=”blkBorder img-share” />

Three days later, due to some skepticism from Twitter users, the CDC had to post a follow-up tweet

After days of debate came a follow-up message from the CDC.

& # 39; We didn't mean to Get it all hot to not wash your chicken! The agency tweeted three days later on April 29. But that's true: kill bacteria by chicken chicken thoroughly, do not wash it.

You should not wash any poultry , meat or eggs before cooking, they can spread bacteria around your kitchen, not away Warranty Safety!

The first advice of the CDC warned against washing chicks before making it in an attempt to prevent bacterial bacteria from spreading to surrounding cooking areas or producing.

It says: & # 39; Chicken juice can spread the kitchen and pollute other foods, kitchen utensils and countertops. & # 39;

& Americans eat more chicken every year than any other meat, & # 39; sa CDC . Chicken can be a nutritious choice, but raw chicken is often contaminated with Campylobacter bacteria and sometimes with Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens bacteria. If you eat undercooked chicken or other foods or beverages contaminated by raw chicken or juice, you can get a food borne disease, also called food poisoning. & # 39;

It was also proposed to use a matte meter to ensure that the chicken is prepared.

Although food poisoning is uncomfortable at any time, children under the age of five and those over 65 with persons with compromised immune systems as well as pregnant women are at risk of developing serious diseases.

It is recommended to call a doctor if the temperature reaches more than 102 degrees, diarrhea lasts more than three days, blood is found in stools, there is prolonged vomiting or if there are signs of dehydration.



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